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Lessons Learned From National Cook for Your Pets Day

On November 1, a little-known holiday came and went: National Cook for Your Pets Day. The holiday was created as a means to highlight proper pet nutrition. Beyond the value of reminding pet owners how essential a fresh, balanced, nutritional diet is for their pet’s health and quality of life, National Cook for Your Pets Day is popular because it speaks to an impulse so many pet owners have.
That impulse: to find a way to thank our cats and dogs for the unconditional love and affection they show us. While we may not be able to articulate how important they are to us with our words, the language of love that our pets are sure to understand is food.

When done right, cooking for your pet provides delicious and nutritious meals your dog or cat will savor (though probably not slowly). Done wrong, it can result in dangerous short- and long-term health risks. Which is why understanding those benefits and risks, as well as alternatives, is crucial.

The Benefits of Cooking for Your Pets

There’s been a substantial recent uptick in pet owners’ concern about the ingredients being used in pet foods and treats. That’s not surprising, considering the recent revelations about the quality and composition of the ingredients in many commercial pet foods and treats. And even more disturbing for pet owners, contaminations that have sickened—and in some cases even killed—thousands of pets.

The shift to more natural food for pets is based on the sound principle that fresh, human-grade food is both better-tasting and better for domestic animals than a daily ration of questionable kibble. Many of those kibbles containing carbohydrate-heavy fillers, rendered meat and animal by-products (the less you know about these, the better), low-quality proteins, low moisture, etc.

So there’s little question that feeding a pet healthy dog food or healthy cat food makes for happy and hearty dogs and pussycats. However, as mentioned earlier, when homemade pet food isn’t prepared properly, it can be dangerous.

The Risks of Cooking for Your Pets and Safe Alternatives

One of the movements that emerged from the fresh pet food trend was the raw food diet. Intuitively it seems like a good idea, as the wild relatives of dogs and cats were eating raw food. But, the thing is, the life expectancy of the wild relatives of dogs and cats was generally a fraction of what it is for pets.

One of the reasons for that is that raw food can contain dangerous pathogens capable of causing illness and even death. As such, raw diets have, appropriately, become far less popular. That’s given some of those cooking up human grade dog food or cat food the impression that cooking renders those foods safe, which unfortunately isn’t the case.

There are dozens of human-friendly foods that are really bad for dogs and cats, cooked or raw. Grapes and raisins, avocado, citrus, coconut products, dairy products, many nuts, and allium foods like garlic, chives, and onions are just a few that can sicken or poison pets. And some products well-meaning owners cook, even when trying to avoid unsafe ingredients, may still contain them.

But by far the biggest risk of creating meals for your pet isn’t that you’ll accidentally mix in something they shouldn’t eat—it’s that the meals you cook will very likely be nutritionally unbalanced. In fact, research involving 200 home-prepared dog food recipes found that a staggering 95% of them were nutritionally unbalanced. This is due to a mix of people adjusting the recipes they get from vet nutritionists and being unaware that pets have very specific nutritional needs. Unfortunately, feeding your dog or cat unbalanced meals with nutrient deficiencies can lead to major, even fatal issues. The damages from this are gradual and can't be reversed, so by the time pet owners find out what's happened, it's typically too late to fix.

There are, of course, safe alternatives. One of them is, well, practicing safety. Be vigilant about your ingredients and their sourcing and, if possible, cook everything sous-vide to preserve nutrition and moisture. Research has found that vegetables cooked via sous-vide retain nutrients better than when cooked using other methods. And if you’re going to cook meals at home, be sure to use recipes developed by board-certified veterinary nutritionists in order to help avoid serving your cat or dog unbalanced meals.

Or, if that all seems a little daunting, consider finding a reputable company that delivers high-quality, human grade dog food that’s cooked sous-vide, and you’ll make your hairy housemate happy indeed. Grocery Pup offers fresh dog food delivery that beyond being delicious is also nutritionally balanced as the company works with a veterinarian nutritionist to make sure their recipes are both safe and delicious.

About Grocery Pup

If your furry best friend could start a dog food company, it’d be Grocery Pup. They are a by dog-lovers, for dog-lovers operation that specializes in the convenient home delivery of delicious, nutritious, safe, and well-balanced human grade dog food. Every bit of their canine cuisine, including sensitive stomach dog food, is overseen and approved by a veterinarian nutritionist, and it’s all cooked to safety and succulence with sous-vide technology in a human-grade kitchen.

Fetch the healthy, delicious dog food your pup will thank you for, at Grocerypup.com



Original Source: https://goo.gl/7hY2V1

Kicking Kibble: Canine Cuisine Taken Up a Notch

If you have a dog and an internet connection, you’re probably aware that pet owners sometimes disagree about things. You’re also probably aware that on the internet, “sometimes disagree” means “argue profusely.” One of the most contentiously debated topics among those who debate pet-related issues on the internet is what to feed your dog. Or, far more importantly, what not to feed your dog.

 

It seems the most contentious of pet foods is kibble. The sheer volume of impassioned claims made for and against kibble vs. raw and fresh dog food can obscure the actual facts.

 

 

So, according to those facts, what should a responsible dog owner actually feed their pup?

 

The Trouble with Kibble

 

As is the case with most big questions in life, the answer is more about a gray area than necessarily spelled out in black and white. Still, the anti-kibble crowd is backed up by some pretty compelling stuff. Many of the complaints are pretty common sense. Dry kibble can contain around 40-60% carbohydrates, it retains very little moisture (hence, “dry” kibble), and the protein in kibble is typically cringe-worthy feed-grade rendered meat. Not the highest quality, most appetizing stuff imaginable, and research on mammalian digestion found that, not too surprisingly, carnivorous pets digest actual foodstuff better than extruded kibble.(Though the worst consequence cited by that research is the possibility of bloating.)

 

Less benign-seeming, over years of testing, a whole slew of nasty-sounding and potentially carcinogenic chemicals have been found in kibble. In fact, the high temperature production method for making kibble has been linked to the Maillard reaction, which has been shown to create carcinogens—and that’s not what you want in your pup’s next meal.

 

As a caring, cautious dog owner it’s best to err on the side of caution when it comes to what you serve your pup. After all, you probably wouldn’t dish up a meal for yourself with by-products, rendered meats, fillers, and chemicals—which are often found in commercial dog food—so why would you for your fuzzy best friend?

 

Next-Level Doggy Dining

 

There is an option that bypasses the aforementioned kibble issues. And apologies to the raw dog food camp—it’s not turning to a raw diet. Though the use of real human grade food in raw diets, when served in the appropriate portions, can be great for dogs, the risk of pathogens in raw food is considerably higher than it is for kibble.

 

The key is finding a reputable fresh dog food delivery outfit online that prepares human grade dog food and employs a “gentle cooking” method, such as sous-vide, to cook your pup’s meal safely and kill pathogens. This method provides your canine connoisseur with safe, moist food that has the balanced vitamin, mineral, and general nutrient content that only real food has. And, perhaps most importantly to your pup—flavor that blows kibble out of the water.

 

If you’re concerned about kibble, give fresh dog food delivery ago. Your canine companion will love you even more—if that’s possible.

 

About Grocery Pup

 

 

Grocery Pup is your pup’s dream come true. For dog lovers by dog lovers, they specialize in home delivery of delicious, nutritious sous-videcooked meals for your fuzzy friends. It’s perfect for fussy eaters or pooches who need sensitive stomach dog food. Grocery Pup is proud to provide your pup pals with a healthy, well-rounded diet created with a veterinarian nutritionist. Grocery Pup meals are crafted from human-grade whole food ingredients and cooked in a USDA-certified human grade kitchen. This means you’ll find no rendered meats, fillers, chemicals, or by-products in any Grocery Pup product. Instead, you’ll find real, high-quality ingredients your pup will love.

 

Find the healthy dog food your pup will beg for at Grocerypup.com

 

Original Source: https://goo.gl/D1mWGG

The Safe and Healthy Alternative to a Raw Dog Food Diet

Supporters of the raw dog food movement are without a doubt coming from a place of love for their pups. They point out that raw food more closely resembles the meals that dogs and their canine ancestors would have eaten, so unlike kibble, a raw diet is exactly the sort of fare that dogs have evolved to eat. And those supporters are absolutely right.

That being said, does the fact that Spot or Lassie’s wolf ancestors ate nothing but raw food really mean that a raw diet is the best or healthiest way to go? And, if not, is there a healthy dog food alternative? For the answers to these questions, read on, dog lovers.

 



Why a Raw Diet Isn’t a Great Idea

For those unfamiliar with the raw diet, it’s just what it sounds like—a mixture of uncooked foodstuffs. The most commonly touted formula for a raw meal is a 5:1:1 ratio of raw meat, fish, or poultry; veggies; and a carb like rice, sweet potatoes, or oats.

In defense of raw diet proponents, the raw regimen does have elements that are superior to a diet of kibble. For instance, raw food is generally easier to digest, it retains more moisture, and you tend to know exactly what’s in your dog’s bowl. That’s the good.

As for the bad: Raw food can have a heightened risk of harboring harmful bacteria. Having watched them eat things best not considered or discussed, we know that dogs have tough tummies. However, that doesn’t mean “invincible tummies.” Dogs can and do contract any number of nasty pathogens from eating bad food, just like us. And it’s not just owners serving up questionable chicken.

A disturbing FDA study that tested 196 raw pet food samples found Listeria monocytogenes or salmonella contamination in 47 of them. There are some additional risks, as raw meals made by pet owners and even some pet food companies can be nutritionally unbalanced, especially if an informed veterinarian nutritionist (with your pup’s best interest at heart)wasn’t involved in the creation of the meals.

The Healthy and Safe Alternative

So where does that leave us? The takeaway you’re (hopefully) left with after considering the benefits and drawbacks of a raw diet is that the best-case doggy dinner scenario is one that retains the benefits of a raw diet but without the risk.

Thankfully for dogs and their people, that’s an entirely doable scenario. The key is feeding your dog a diet of human grade dog food that has been professionally created and gently cooked via sous-vide. Overcooking results in food that’s not only less appetizing, but it also reduces the profusion of vitamins and minerals, resulting in less healthy food. And if it’s not tastier and healthier than the alternative, what’s the point?

The options for giving your pooch sous-videcooked, healthy dog food are the same ones you have for the obtaining of your own meal: You can make it or buy it. As sous-vide equipment isn’t common kitchen accoutrements and can be a bit of an initial investment, delivery of humangrade, sous-vide dog food from a reliable and responsible company such as Grocery Pup seems to be the most popular preference. Additionally, by ordering your pup fresh dog food from Grocery Pup, you can rest assured he or she will be eating high-quality, well-balanced meals in tasty flavors that were created with a veterinarian nutritionist.

Whatever you choose, if the result of that decision is your best friend getting food as healthy and delicious as he or she deserves, you’ve done it right.

About Grocery Pup

Grocery Pup is your pup’s dream come true. For dog lovers by dog lovers, they specialize in home delivery of delicious, nutritious sous-videcooked meals for your fuzzy friends. It’s perfect for fussy eaters or pooches who need sensitive stomach dog food. Grocery Pup is proud to provide your pup pals with a healthy, well-rounded diet created with a veterinarian nutritionist. Grocery Pup meals are crafted from human-grade whole food ingredients and cooked in a USDA-certified human grade kitchen. This means you’ll find no rendered meats, fillers, chemicals, or by-products in any Grocery Pup product. Instead, you’ll find real, high-quality ingredients your pup will love.

Find the healthy dog food your pup will beg for at Grocerypup.com


Original Source: https://goo.gl/h9cGmo

Prepping Your Home for Your New Puppy’s Homecoming

Making the big decision to introduce a furry friend into your household can be exciting, especially if you’ve been wanting to find the perfect puppy for a while. This is a huge milestone for you and your new dog, and you’ll want to make sure everything’s in place before they come home. It’s important not only to gather all of the supplies you need but also to remember to make your home feel as comfortable for your new fur baby as possible. 

 

Before your puppy’s homecoming, here are a few things to do to make sure this transition goes as smoothly as possible. 

 

 

Assign Responsibilities

 

Unless you’re going to be the sole caretaker for this pup, assigning responsibilities to trustworthy family members establishes who is doing what early on. Different things to talk about before you get a puppy include:

 

  • Who’s taking him or her on multiple walks every day?
  • Does a specific person feed them fresh dog food in the morning and night?
  • Can someone play with him or her in the afternoon during the week and can someone else take them to the dog park on the weekend?
  • Where does the new puppy sleep?

 

If you plan on taking your puppy to get training, try hard to get everyone on the same page about commands, treats, and good habits.

 

Meal Plan

 

Ask the current caretaker for your puppy which foods your pupis currently being fed. Puppies’ stomachs can be more sensitive than when they’re full grown. Choose a sensitive stomach dog food to useas a topper on puppy kibble as a gentle way to encourage them to eat up so they get all the nutrition they need to grow big and strong. (Or, for smaller breeds, louder and more hyper.) 

 

Don’t forget to put out a water bowl for your puppy that they can access at all times. If your furry friend tends to eat everything in front of them no matter what, specific meal times might work better. 

 

Find a Veterinarian 

 

Choosing a vet clinic before you pick up your pup not only gives you peace of mind but also makes it easy to set up your first appointment soon after your puppy’s homecoming. Check online reviews and ask for pet owners’ recommendations for top-notch veterinarians in your area. 

 

Questions to ask your vet during your first appointment can include:

  • What should I be feeding my puppy and how often?
  • When can I introduce him or her to more social situations with other dogs?
  • Is there anything about this breed that I should look out for?
  • How many shots does he or she need over the next few months?

 

Gather paperwork from the breeder or shelter and bring it to your vet appointment. Things they’re looking for include current shots, age, breed, and previous health issues. 

 

Puppy Proof

 

The easiest way to keep your pup out of trouble is to remove any chewable items or block off areas he or she shouldn’t go into. Tape electrical cords to furniture or baseboards, put shoes away in the closet, gate off the stairs, and put people food out of reach of their curious snouts. 

 

Choose a Potty Spot

 

This is super important! If you live in an apartment, you’re probably going to need designated paper areas for your new furry addition. Or, if you have a backyard, anywhere with grass might be okay for number ones but not number twos. Decide ahead of time to make house training easier once your puppy arrives. 

 

Confusing a young pup with directions is the best way to make sure you have frequent indoor accidents. Stay on top of taking him or her out every hour for the first few days and reward them for going potty outside. 

 

About Grocery Pup

 

Grocery Pup is changing the way we feel about dog food. They provide fresh dog food delivery, allowing you to feed your pup a healthy, well-rounded diet without the hassle of making it yourself. Their dog food is designed by a veterinarian nutritionist, crafted from whole food ingredients, and cooked in a USDA-certified human-grade kitchen.

 

Find the dog food your pup will beg for at Grocerypup.com

 

Original source: https://goo.gl/jRVMuB

Healthy Ingredients for Your Pup’s Diet (And What to Avoid)

Ever look at the ingredient list on your pet’s food? It can be hard to discern which ingredients are healthy for man’s best friend and which have considerably less nutritional value. If the health of your dog is important to you, here is a list of healthy ingredients to include in your pup’s diet and less nutritional elements to avoid. 

 

 

Nutrition-Packed Ingredients

 

These ingredients are considered healthy for dogs and can be eaten alone or included in a snack or meal. Check your dog food for these ingredients to see if your dog is receiving enough nutrients in his or her diet.

 

Carrots

 

Great in fresh dog food and as a snack, carrots are packed with nutrients like fiber and vitamin A, along with a crunchy texture that dogs love. In fact, this texture can act as a cleaning tool against plaque and build-up. Carrots are safe for sensitive stomachs and are low in fat and calories. 

 

Peas

 

Peas are often included in high-quality healthy dog food because of their protein and vitamin value. While too much of a good thing can be unhealthy, peas in moderation are healthy for dogs. 

 

Lean Meats

 

Dogs are carnivores by nature and need lean meats in their diets. Turkey, pork, and beef are all good sources of vitamin B and amino acids. If you’re feeding your pup a meaty snack, check to make sure that the meat is cooked all the way through. Turkey is great meat to look for in sensitive stomach dog food

 

Liver

 

Just like humans, our furry friends need vitamins and iron, too. Liver is a popular ingredient in healthier dog food and snacks because it contains more essential nutrients than muscle meat. Reminder: Liver does include a high amount of vitamin A, which can be hazardous in large amounts for dogs. Be mindful to not overdo the liver treats or feed your dog too much liver.

 

Ingredients to Avoid

 

While these ingredients are not considered healthy for man’s best friend, they are often included in feed grade dog food. If your current dog food brand carries any of these ingredients, it’s time to switch to a healthier diet for your pup’s health. 

 

Fillers

 

These are often included to cut costs in making dry dog food. These don’t have much nutritional value and often appear as corn, wheat, oat, and soybean. Fillers can cause sensitive stomachs to be easily upset, making it hard for your dog to receive the nutrition he or she really needs.

 

Rendered Meat

 

This element appears more often than you would think in dog foods. Rendered meat is made by combining animal by-products in a grinder to blend it all together and then is heated to remove the excess fat and grease. The resulting product is considered rendered meat and used in animal feed and pet foods. Dogs need lean meats, not animal by-products, for a healthy diet. 

 

About Grocery Pup

 

Grocery Pup is changing the way we feel about dog food. They provide human grade dog food, allowing you to feed your pup a healthy, well-rounded diet without the hassle of making it yourself. Their dog food is designed by a veterinarian nutritionist, crafted from whole food ingredients, and cooked in a USDA-certified human-grade kitchen. You’ll find no rendered meats, fillers, chemicals, or by-products within their products. Instead, you’ll see real ingredients that you can understand.

 

Find the dog food your pup will beg for at Grocerypup.com

 

Original Source: https://goo.gl/xAFWND

Grocery Pup creates food from natural whole food ingredients for optimal digestibility. You’ll never find any corn, soy, wheat, or other fillers in Grocery Pup’s dog food. Made in a human grade USDA inspected facility using human grade ingredients, you’ll get healthy, fresh dog food delivered straight to your door.

Shop now at: https://www.grocerypup.com/

Quick, Easy DIY Dog Treats Made from Whole Ingredients

Dogs are what they eat, just like humans. What we feed our dogs matters to their longevity, health, and happiness. We all want to keep our 4-legged friends around as long as possible, feeding them healthy dog food that is preferably human grade in nature will keep your bestie by your side longer.

Human grade dog food means that everything used to make it is safe for human consumption, and includes no by-products, rendered meat, chemicals, or fillers. It’s just simple ingredients and whole food.

 


If you wouldn’t eat it, why would you want your friend to? Get started on the journey to feeding your pup healthy, real ingredients with these dog treat recipes that take under 10 minutes to make.

Chicken and Apple Pupsicle

This summer treat couldn’t be easier. Cool your dog down on hot summer days by combining small apple chunks and chicken broth into a concoction that your pup will love. You’ll need:

  • 2-3 medium-sized apples
  • 24-32 ounces of chicken broth (if store bought, avoid added salt, onions, and garlic)
  • Several ice trays or small plastic containers

Slice apples into chunks and place into your designated container. Pour chicken broth over apples, fill about ¾ of the way. Place in freezer for at least 4 hours. Make your pup’s day by giving them this icy treat.

Pumpkin and Ginger No-Bake Treats

If your dog is afflicted with an upset stomach routinely, it’s probably time to give sensitive stomach dog food a chance. For occasional stomach irritation, these treats are crafted from ingredients that settle sensitive stomachs. For this recipe, you’ll need:

  • 15-ounces of pumpkin puree (Can use canned or fresh. However, DON’T use pumpkin pie filling!)
  • 2.5 cups of old-fashioned oats plus extra for rolling
  • ¼ cup water
  • ¼ teaspoon of ginger

In a large bowl, mix the pumpkin puree and the water together, stirring to combine. Pour in oats and mix well. Roll balls sized for your pup in your hands, and then roll into extra oats until they are lightly coated. Refrigerate for a minimum of 12 hours.

About Grocery Pup

Grocery Pup is changing the way we feel about dog food. They deliver human grade dog food straight to your door, allowing you to provide your pup with a healthy, well-rounded diet without the hassle of making it yourself. Their dog food is designed by veterinarians, crafted from whole food ingredients, and cooked in a USDA-certified human-grade kitchen. You’ll find no rendered meats, fillers, chemicals, or by-products within their products. Instead, you’ll see real ingredients that you can understand.

Find the dog food your pup will beg for at Grocerypup.com


Original Source:
https://goo.gl/s78p5G

Human Grade Dog Food Vs. Feed Grade Dog Food

You love your dog and want to provide them the very best. That should include meeting their food needs with healthy options. The most beneficial food for your dog is a healthy dog food that is crafted from fresh, whole food. If it is human grade dog food, all the better.

The differences between human grade and feed grade are staggering if the health and safety of your pet are important to you. Not only can it contain ingredients that humans wouldn’t eat, it often includes ingredients that are unsafe to be consumed by humans due to their known side effects.

 


Human Grade

Ingredients must be suitable and safe for human consumption. To be considered human grade, food must be manufactured in a USDA inspected facility that produces only human grade food. According to Petfood Industry, “The use of the term ‘human grade’ is only acceptable to the product as a whole. Every ingredient and finished food must be stored, handled, processed, and transported in a manner that is consistent with current good manufacturing processes (cGMPs).”

Feed Grade

Feed grade, on the other hand, cannot legally be sold as human food as it can/could contain ingredients proven harmful to humans, such as:

By-Products

One way that pet food companies cut corners and cost is including by-products in their food. Doing so reduces the cost of production while maintaining high protein quantities in the food. By-products are the castoffs other than meat that make their way into commercial dog food. The spleen, kidneys, fatty tissue, the brain, blood, bone, undeveloped eggs, stomach, and intestines are all items that could be included in feed grade dog food. By-products can also include road kill, expired meat, and diseased animals.

Rendered Meat

The process that animal by-products go through in order to be used in feed grade food is called meat rendering, which reduces by-products into a gray, fatty meat mass. The by-products are placed in a huge grinder that thrashes the meat and blends it all together. It is then heated for hours until the grease and fat float along the top of this concoction. The finished product is considered meat and by meal—and placed into feed grade pet food.

Fillers

One more way to cut cost and increase profit margins is the addition of fillers to your pet food. These feature very little nutritional value but are relied upon to make the expensive components of the product stretch further. Fillers can include corn, wheat and rice bran, oat and soybean hulls. Healthy, fresh dog food should never include unnecessary fillers.

Splitting

This is a deception crafted to make you believe you are getting more out of your pet food than you are. According to petMD, an example of this is, “a cat food may have fish broth as the first ingredient, corn gluten meal as the second, fish as the third, and animal fat preserved with ground yellow corn as the fourth. It looks as if fish is a big part of the food, but this is a corn-based product.” Here the food producer has split corn into two ingredients so it’s listed further down the ingredient list.

About Grocery Pup

Grocery Pup is changing the way we feel about dog food. They provide fresh dog food delivery, allowing you to feed your pup a healthy, well-rounded diet without the hassle of making it yourself. Their dog food is designed by veterinarians, crafted from whole food ingredients, and cooked in a USDA-certified human-grade kitchen. You’ll find no rendered meats, fillers, chemicals, or by-products within their products. Instead, you’ll see real ingredients that you can understand.

Find the dog food your pup will beg for at Grocerypup.com



Original Source: https://goo.gl/DCXGXW